Publications & Resources

Explore key scholarship, reports, resources and work from our community. 

Our faculty, students and researchers work together everyday to contribute to a better world by grappling with urgent problems we are facing in India. We conduct rigorous work to produce high quality learning resources and publications to contribute to public discourse and social change. Here, we feature a sample from our work for everyone to access. You can explore featured resources, policies, and the latest publications from the University. 

To explore all the work of our University, please visit our publications repository.

  • Lakes Reservoirs 2022 Issue Information Page 1
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    Authors

    Abstract

    The present study analyses civic and community-based initiatives in conserving urban ecological commons in India, which have been increasingly polluted, encroached upon and degraded because of rapid land-use transformations. Bangalore, a city in south India, has one of the largest networks of manmade lakes, some of which are restored and managed by citizen groups, civil society, environmental activists and voluntary private bodies. The restoration process interfaces with urban policy making, shaping predominant management agendas in association with the State. Community initiatives in conserving the lakes are not only well-organised, but also play a crucial role in making city commons vibrant and integral nodes of cultural and social identification. However, the contemporary management system involving citizen groups in lake conservation is largely at odds with the tradition of community-managed lake systems previously existing in the city, which have eroded as the city became industrialised and increased in size and population, resulting in rapid landscape transformations. Against this background, the present study aims to illustrate that a seemingly representative community management of city ecologies is often embedded in an overwhelming political context. It also discusses the need for an urgent deconstruction to better understand how overtly flexible and dynamic restoration actions interact with inequality, power and conflicts. The results of the present study emphasise that the current participatory and community-driven initiatives of ecological restoration in Indian cities unfortunately accord limited significance to the overarching questions of social justice and relations of power.

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  • Magazine

    Learning Curve Issue 14

    in Azim Premji University

    LC Issue 14 Cover
    Published
    Authors

      Abstract

      This issue is about a term that is very much in the minds of educators today: Socio-emotional Learning (SEL), and which has become an integral part of learning and school life. Schools have Happiness Curriculums’ to develop self-awareness, enable effective communication, and work collaboratively towards collective goals instead of individual ones to bring equity to the learning process by becoming inclusive and empathetic. Teachers are looking at children as citizens who need to take their place in the larger social setting and learn to contribute to society while themselves leading meaningful and mindful lives.

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    • 9781032056814
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      Abstract

      It is easy to lose hope in the future. The 20th-century growth model is no longer viable as is evident from the spiralling climate crisis. At the time of writing this paper, the atmospheric carbon dioxide reading is a record high of 417 ppm. The current COVID-19 outbreak (and prediction of more such pandemics) is a grim sign of humanity’s distorted relationship with nature. Scientifc data related to the breaching of four of the nine planetary boundaries puts a dent on the aspirations and chase for unfettered economic growth and increasing material wealth. In reality, it is and always has been a dance of death resulting in several crises that we encounter today – extreme inequality, rising populism, degrading of our natural environments and violence and injustice of various kinds. Mahatma Gandhi warned of such a fate for India and the world when he wrote, “…like the proverbial moth (India) will burn itself eventually in the fame round which it dances more and more furiously”

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    • Magazine

      i wonder… Issue 7

      in Azim Premji University

      I wonder Issue 7 Dec21 Cover
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      Authors

        Abstract

        Why do party balloons rise in air? How high can they go? When do they drift to the ground?

        How much water do plants lose? Do they lose it only as water vapour? Can they regulate water-loss? 

        Which chemical bonds are stronger — covalent or ionic? How can we tell? 

        Can we grow a dense forest of native species in congested urban spaces or degraded land? How long would this take?

        Who were the first people to measure the size of the earth? How did they do it? 

        Join us in exploring these questions in our new section — Ask a Question. 

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      • Chapter in a Book

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        Abstract

        Cities are often seen as incubators for enterprise and innovation. However, in this urbanisation era, we seem to suffer from a lack of imagination on how to handle the many environmental problems associated with expanding cities. This is especially true in the case of the peri-urban interface (PUI), a geographical and conceptual landscape with which the city core often has a contentious relationship. In this chapter, we look at the complex linkages between water and waste in the PUIs of two metropolitan cities: Bengaluru and Kolkata. We look at two water systems: Kannuru lake in Bengaluru and Kolkata’s wetlands. Kannuru is a freshwater lake that supported traditional livelihoods and subsistence use by local communities, while Kolkata’s peri-urban wetlands not only served as the city’s natural sewage treatment plant but also enabled agriculture and aquaculture. Urbanization has adversely impacted both these water systems. Kannuru lake is threatened by a landfill on its periphery, while sewage-based farming and fisheries in Kolkata’s wetlands have been impacted by changes in land use and composition of sewage. We unravel the complexity in the waste-water relationship, where waste is seen as a pollutant in one and as a nutrient in the other. We attempt to understand how we can re-envision waste and water linkages in the PUIs of expanding cities if India needs to move towards a sustainable future.

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      • Magazine

        Learning Curve Issue 11

        in Azim Premji University

        LC Issue 11 Dec 2021 Cover
        Published
        Authors

          Abstract

          When the life-altering COVID-19 first struck, teachers and students alike had to re-organise themselves; teachers in their pedagogical methodologies, students in their learning capabilities. Overnight, everyone went digital – smartphones, computers and TV screens became the printed page and everyone learned as they went along. 

          This issue of the Learning Curve is devoted to the questions everyone had to face during the period of school closures: what can we do to mitigate the difficulties of adjustment that primary school children will undoubtedly face on their return to school? The most heartening aspect of the articles in the issue is the tremendous resilience and innovativeness displayed by everyone concerned in adapting to school closures.

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        • Issue 10 Cover
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            Abstract

            Issue 10 of Pathshala Bheetar aur Bahar focus on classroom processes. There is an article on an interesting conversation around the issue of Gender, an article on freedom of expression in a classroom, teacher being sensitive and encouraging children expressing their thoughts in their own language. There are articles that bring out the importance of the use of children books, illustrates how writing is about expressing and is not a mere letter reproducing exercise. The article on peer-instruction in a science class brings out the possibilities that the teacher needs to have and the care that must be exercised in making peer-learning effective and truly participative. 

            The article on social science discusses its nature and brings out the disconnection between the social studies taught in the classrooms and the issues that confront children. The absence of day-to-day concerns seems even more stark during the COVID pandemic as the classrooms cannot take up the concerns of children and their families.

            These are just a few examples of the variety of articles and the issues raised in them. 

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          • Magazine

            Learning Curve Issue 8

            in Azim Premji University

            LC Dec2020
            Published
            Authors

              Abstract

              COVID-19 made it clearer than ever that the school does not and cannot be looked at in isolation from society. In this issue, there are articles that show not only teachers supporting children’s learning during the closure, but also how parents overwhelmingly supported teachers to continue their work; how, when all other ways of distance learning failed, the unanimous decision of parents was that the education of their children should go on.

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            • Magazine

              Learning Curve Issue 5

              in Azim Premji University

              Learning Curve Issue 5 Dec 2019 Cover
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              Authors

                Abstract

                In this issue, we have a wide range of articles from writers who have looked at children with disabilities in a variety of ways- but through the same lens: inclusion. There are articles tracing the history of different organizations which have worked for several years to create opportunities for the education of children with disabilities, language acquisition, travel, opportunities for independence and respectful acceptance, among others.

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              • Magazine

                Learning Curve Issue 2

                in Azim Premji University

                Learning Curve Issue 2 Dec 2018 Cover
                Published
                Authors

                  Abstract

                  Teaching Learning Materials (TLMs) and Aids, which form the focus of this issue of Learning Curve, an indispensable part of a teacher’s bag of tricks, is a generic term that describes any material that supports and buttresses teachers’ efforts in getting a class of diverse capabilities to understand the basics of any learning. They have to fulfil some basic requirements: simplify concepts, provide the chance of practice, increase interest and motivation, help to explain complexities, concretise abstractions, enrich the course — though, of course, a single TLM may not meet all the above criteria. Thus, they are various kinds of TLMs, starting with the humble, but ever-present, blackboard (which has come in for much adverse criticism) and going all the way up to smart classrooms’, with all the advanced technology they entail. TLMs have the added value of aiding the memory — when children see how a concept/​rule of language/​experiment works, it is more likely to stay in the active memory than just learning the same thing by heart. This issue presents a wide variety of opinions and experiences with TLMs and Aids.

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                • SWI 2018 Front
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                  Abstract

                  India is one of the world’s fastest growing economies. To be a stable and prosperous democracy, this growth must be accompanied by the creation of meaningful, secure and remunerative employment. Realising this goal requires a grounded and comprehensive overview of the state of labour markets, employment generation, demographic challenges and the nature of growth.

                  The State of Working India (SWI) is envisioned as a regular publication that delivers well-researched, analytically useful information on India’s labour market, by bringing together researchers, journalists, civil society activists, and policymakers interested in labour and employment issues.

                  The report is based on the research of CSE staff, as well as on background papers which are available online. SWI conceives of India’s ongoing structural transformation as composed of two processes — movement of workers from agriculture to non-farm occupations (the Kuznets process) and from informal activities to formal ones (the Lewis process). But it adds crucial considerations of social equity and ecological sustainability to this standard framework. In the 21st century, Lewis and Kuznets have to meet Ambedkar and Gandhi.

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