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Student Journal of Education and Development issue 4

Editorial

Students’ Journal of Education and Development (SJED) is a space where the student community of Azim Premji University talks to itself and the wider world about issues related to public importance and interest. This fourth edition of SJED brings together a collection of papers that takes this spirit of engagement forward with some insightful research articles, perspective building pieces, and notes.

The first research article in this volume by Aradhana Sanil, Policy Analysis of Demonetisation in India: 1946–2016, looks at the demonitisation policy of 2016 and the factors that led up to the policy decision, while analysing instances of similar policy changes in 1946 and 1978, in India. In this paper, the author argues that the demonetisation policy of 2016 was a technocratic decision, with very strong political and economic motivations. The second research article, Construction of Science Identities Among Students, by Shruthi H Kedilaya, is an attempt to understand science identity construction and reconstruction among school students. It looks at identity as an analytic lens to explore students’ and teachers’ views about science. Studying identity as a construct can help us in understanding how learning of and engagement with science successfully takes place inside and outside of school classrooms. The third research article by Ketaki Prabha, Women in Non-Traditional Workspaces: A Study of Women Bus Conductors in Delhi, looks at identifying the degrees of autonomy that women experience in a nontraditional workplace, specifically in the case of women bus conductors in Delhi. It tries to understand the perception of gender identity of these women and how it is influenced through their interactions with the workspace.

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Apart from research articles this issue of SJED has a range of perspectival pieces and notes. In the essay titled Unrealised Human Right to Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation: The Conundrum of The Indian Supreme Court, Ankita Guru argues that countries like India deny their obligation to human rights, and will continue to do so with impunity, unless there is a binding responsibility for the protection of LGBTs, with mechanisms for enforcing adjudication and dispute resolution. In the next essay, The Political Green: An Analysis of Manifestos of Indian Political Parties from an Environmental Perspective, Vaishnavi Rathore analyses the 2009 and 2014 national manifestos of Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), Indian National Congress (INC), Communist Party of India (CPI) and Communist Party of India (Marxist) (CPI-M), and the 2014 manifesto of Aam Aadmi Party (AAP). This paper analyses the context of the presence of environment in the manifestos as a reflection of nationalist values and as influences of the reigning discourse of sustainable development. The paper then goes on to reflect upon the nature of green politics in India. In the next essay, Franz Fanon: Anti-Cartesian Decoloniality, Transmodernity and Pedagogic Possibilities, Anwar Salahudeen critically analyses some aspects of Cartesian philosophy, which is considered as one of the foundational epistemic sources of modern rationality and worldview. It makes an argument for the necessity of thinking beyond this Eurocentric rationality, which forms the foundation of all modern educational systems in the world. In the last essay of this section titled, The Truth about Fiction: Caste, Class, Gender and Dissent in Urmila Pawar’s Short Stories, Vaishnavi Mahrukar seeks to understand how fiction writing has cognised the historical oppression of the women of the dalit community, who have been subjected to triple discriminations on the basis of caste, class and gender.

The last piece in this issue of SJED revisits the book Flight Behaviour by Barbara Kingsolver which promises to become a classic. Parul Dubey, in her review essay, first provides a brief introduction to the author and an overview of the book’s broad storyline. This is followed by a more detailed discussion around the key characters, their background stories, journeys, hopes and despair. This essay concludes with a discussion of points of personal connect with the book and the possibilities of the advancement of environment sustainability through literature such as Flight Behaviour.

As must be evident from the above discussion, these papers cover a wide terrain in the domains of education, development, public policy and law. They deal with the issues at hand from a set of plural perspectives. Such a pluralistic exploration of social issues is the need of the hour. This edition has been made possible by many other current and old students, apart from the journal’s Advisory Board, the Editorial Collective and the Coordination and Advocacy teams. Some noteworthy mentions are Saumil Sharma from the batch of 2014-16, and Ankita Aggarwal and Neha Mohanty from the batch of 2016-18.

   
Research Articles

Aradhana Sanil
Policy Analysis of Demonetisation in India: 1946–2016
 
 
Shruthi H Kedilaya
Construction of Science Identities Among Students
 

Ketaki Prabha
Women in Non-Traditional Workspaces: A Study of Women Bus Conductors in Delhi
 
 

Perspectives and Practices

Ankita Guru
Unrealised Human Right to Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation: The Conundrum of The Indian Supreme Court
 
 
Vaishnavi Rathore
The Political Green: An Analysis of Manifestoes of Indian Political Parties from an Environmental                                   Perspective
 


Anwar Salahudeen
Franz Fanon: Anti-Cartesian Decoloniality, Transmodernity and Pedagogic Possibilities
 
 
Notes


Vaishnavi Mahurkar
The Truth about Fiction: Caste, Class, Gender and Dissent in Urmila Pawar’s Short Stories
 

Classics Revisited


Parul Dubey
Book Review: Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver
 

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